The redundancies in redundant sentences and phrases: How (not) to be redundant

First and foremost, cut back on redundant sentences that repeat themselves several times.

 

This is an absolutely complete list of redundant examples that is absolutely indispensable to improving clarity in your writing. It will be a forward progress when we achieve better clarity in our communication. However, in my actual experience, I find that by repeating similar words adds a complete opposite in clarity of what it means to be clear. By not reducing redundancy in communication, you have completely destroyed all clarity for your friends and family and everyone else. It is clearly evident that it is important to reduce your redundant sentences by being concise. 

 

If and when we stop being redundant, our writing become shorter and more condensed. This helps the reader get to the point of their reading what they’re reading. Alas and alack, people continue to pad their sentences to make their writing sound more flowery, yet, there is another educated guess for the use of redundancies in communication.

 

The contributing factor is, I believe is rather paradoxical, increasing clarity of what they are talking about. They believe that using more and more words to describe just exactly what they are saying will help readers understand what they are talking about. The current status of all writing on the internet is completely surrounded with redundancies, spelling errors, and grammatical mistakes. There is a general consensus that clear writing is important to all. After all, we don’t say, Hey, let’s eat grandpa! when we really mean, Hey, let’s eat, grandpa! 

Each and every one of us have been guilty of redundant sentences at one point in our lives, and some continue to repeat their favorite redundant phrases. In order to change, we need mutual agreement; we need to cooperate together by helping to point out redundancies and grammatical mistakes so that we all can improve our English language rather than eradicate the language completely. The end result of this is a community that rarely, if ever, have a miscommunication. After all, how often does over-exaggerated miscommunication happen in familial, business, and personal relationships? Let’s end that with reducing excessive verbiage in our language, and we’re on our way to being clear! The reason is because we are social beings, and by nature, have a need to communicate, and to do that, we need to be clear about what our needs and wants are–clearly stated.

 

 

Phrases came from http://home.comcast.net/~garbl/stylemanual/redundant.htm

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